Design and Technology / Engineering Curriculum

Why is the study of Technology/ Engineering important?

Design and Technology/ Engineering is a practical and valuable subject. It enables children and young people to actively contribute to the creativity, culture, wealth and well-being of themselves, their community and their nation. It teaches how to take risks and so become more resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable. Students develop a critical understanding of the impact of design and technology on daily life and the wider world. Additionally, it provides excellent opportunities for students to develop and apply value judgements of an aesthetic, economic, moral, social, and technical nature both in their own designing and when evaluating the work of others.
Studying Design and Technology/ Engineering includes the use of a broad range of knowledge, skills, and understanding, and prompts engagement in a wide variety of activities. Pupils design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts. Through evaluation of past and present Design and Technology, they develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and wider world issues such as sustainability and enterprise.
All around us are products, which have been engineered using creative design and problem solving, and effective, skilful manufacture.  This allows to help improve lives’ creating things that may have never existed before or even just make our lives more enjoyable.
Students will be able to use the skills learned in Technology/ Engineering in adult life, regardless of their career of choice.  Design and Technology will enable students to be able to be able to apply design skills in their own home and be able to apply manufacturing knowledge into DIY projects around the home.  They will also be able to use, project management, time management and problem-solving skills across a wide range of jobs.

What will the study of Technology/ Engineering teach you?

Our aims in the teaching of Design and Technology;

  • Develop design and making skills
  • Use a range of materials, tools and processes
  • Learn about health and safety in a workshop and protective measure
  • Be able to work individually and as a team
  • Develop resilience through problem solving skills
  • Promote creativity, innovation and individuality
  • Explore the man-made world and encourage the impact this has on society

At Key Stage 3, students develop skills in designing and manufacturing and the key theory topics behind this. We will study materials groups such as timbers, polymers and metals where students will gain an understanding of the source of the materials and the impact this may have on the environment.  They will learn about the properties of individual materials and where they are used in the manufacture of products and therefore be able to make informed decisions on what materials are most suitable for particular jobs.  Students will learn about the different tools and equipment within the workshop and the different processes these do. Using this equipment, they will build confidence, safety and accuracy.   They are given time to solve problems through design and make projects allowing time to take risks and gain resilience.  A key focus area is the impact of technology on society and the environment.  Students will learn about how the development of materials can affect the planet overtime.  Students will study the work of past and present designers to help them become more creative learners and will learn how different cultures can be impacted through design.

At Key Stage 4, students study Engineering, students will develop their knowledge of engineering disciplines and how these have helped shape the modern world.  Students will further develop their knowledge of materials used in engineering and the processes used to manufacture products using these materials.  They will further develop their practical skills and confidence when using a range of materials, tools and processes.

How does the study of Technology/ Engineering support your study in other subjects?

Many of the areas of theory covered within Technology and Engineering can be transferred into their study in other subjects. Within Science, students continue to learn about sourcing materials and their properties; they also learn how to work in a safe manner, throughout the practical element of science.  Physics has many links, students will transfer knowledge about forces and motion, this links within the study of Technology and Engineering, as students need to learn about how motion is converted using cam and linkage systems, they need to be able to understand how gear ratios work and have an understanding of Pascal’s Law for hydraulic systems.  
In Maths, students learn measuring length, mass and volume, which are essential skills in technology and engineering when manufacturing products and testing strength of materials for specific jobs. Students also learn how to use scale in drawing and the importance of scale and proportion to manufacture accurate products.
Technology and Engineering makes close links with IT, students use IT skills to help them use CAD software packaging to be able to create 2D and 3D design ideas and models. 
The impact of Technology and Engineering on society and the environment links with geography in terms of global warming and pollution but also PSHEE studies in terms of recycling and being more considerate about sustainability and the planet.
Students also develop their decision-making, timekeeping, and organisation skills, which are valuable throughout Academy life, employment and everyday life.

Key assessment objectives

At Sirius Academy, students are assessed throughout each year. The assessments ensure that students are continually building their subject specific knowledge and understanding in preparation for the Key Stage 4 course or for use outside of education. Students are assessed periodically with their progress and attainment being mapped to help support each individual in achieving their target grade.

How can the study of Design and Technology/ Engineering support you in the future?

The range of skills and knowledge that are studied at Key Stage 3 and Key Stage 4 are relevant to many areas of employment and further areas of study. If students want to continue their Engineering based education post Y11 there are many college and university courses on offer.

Students can progress onto level 3 engineering qualifications, where they can specialise within different aspects of engineering, such as electrical, mechanical or motor vehicle.

Students may also choose to transfer their practical skills across to other subject areas such as plumbing, electrical and construction courses where they can study at college or complete on the job training through an apprenticeship.

If students prefer the design aspect of the course, they can choose to study A level Product Design, where they will focus on a more creative aspect of designing and making products.

At degree level, students can choose to study product design or specialise in engineering, such as civil, aerospace or mechanical further developing skills gained form level 3 courses.


Scroll right / left on the table below to view all the information.

Design and Technology/ Engineering Subject Overview:

At key Stage 3 students complete a series of 18 lessons within food, prior to rotating on to either Health and Social Care or Food.

Year Group

Area of Study.

Year 7

Within this year, students are introduced into a workshop environment and taught about the safety implications that a workshop could cause through the implementation of practical projects.  Through the theory, we embed knowledge regarding the materials used in their manufacture with some links to the wider world.  Students will have the opportunity to start to think about how designs can be adapted so suit user needs and wants and functionality.
The majority of lesson time, within this year of study, is dedicated to developing practical skill levels.

 

Year 8

Within this year of study, the students will complete a range of practical activities to enable them to continue to develop their medium and higher level making skills. The majority of lesson time, within this year of study, is dedicated to developing practical skill levels. Through the theory, the students will start to develop their knowledge of how their manufacturing techniques link to the wider world and will learn about how industry produce products. They will further develop their materials knowledge by gaining an understanding of where materials are sources and how that can affect the environment.  They will further develop their design sketches into formal ideas using technical drawing skills.

 

Year 9

Within this year of study, students will continue to develop their higher level making skills. Students will complete a range of practical activities in which they will consider and choose materials to use due to their suitability, also the processes and techniques that could be used for their manufacturing due to the processes they have learned in Year 7 and 8. They will further develop their design skills by using the influence of other designers, past and present, to help influence their own designs whilst still considering suitability and functionality of a product.  Students will also develop their drawing skills by encompassing the skills they have learned and transferring across to CAD work. They will further enhance their knowledge of new and emerging technology and put this into practice by using CAM machinery within their manufacture.

At Key Stage 4 students, complete NCFE Level 1/ 2 Combined Technical Award in Engineering Studies.

In Year 10 students complete unit 1, this unit is assessed as a written exam and contributes 40% of the final grade.  They will also start to study unit 2.

Academic Term

Learning outcomes

 

Assessment criteria

 

Half term 1

Unit 1 LO1 – Understand engineering disciplines

 

1.1.1 Understand how specific engineering products and projects have shaped the modern world; Mechanical, Electrical and electronic, Aerospace, Communications, Chemical, Civil, Automotive, Biomedical, Software.

 

1.1.2 Understand how the engineering industry complies with government legislation such as the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and the Control of substances Hazardous to Health.

 

Half term 2

Unit 1 LO3 – Understand how to read engineering drawings
Unit 1 LO4 – Understand the properties and characteristics of engineering materials and why specific materials are selected for engineering applications

 

3.1.1 Be able to read and understand all the elements which are included in engineering drawings, such as, line types, tolerances, layout, scale and projection styles.

 

3.1.2 Understand the purpose of using set drawing conventions through the British Standard, BS8888.

 

 

4.1.1 Understand how materials exhibit properties and characteristics in engineering products.

 

Half term 3

Unit 1 LO4 – Understand the properties and characteristics of engineering materials and why specific materials are selected for engineering applications

Unit 1 LO5 – Understand engineering tools, equipment and machines

 

4.1.2 To identify a range of materials and be able to say why they are selected for engineering products and projects.

 

5.1.1 Understand safe and correct use of tools, and equipment used in the engineering industry for marking out materials.

 

5.1.2 Understand safe and correct use of tools, equipment and machines used in the engineering industry for modifying materials.

 

5.1.3 Understand safe and correct use of tools, equipment and machines used in the engineering industry for joining materials.

 

5.1.4 Understand safe and correct use of tools, equipment and machines used in the engineering industry for finishing materials.

 

5.2.1 Understand control measures used to stay safe in the workshop

 

Half term 4

Unit 1 LO2 – Understand how science and Mathematics is applied in engineering.

 

 

 

Unit 1 Exam Preparation

 

2.1.1 Understand how SI units of measurement are used in engineering products and projects.

 

2.1.2 Be able to apply the basic of SI units in projects and products

 

2.2.1 Understand how mathematical and scientific equations are used in engineering disciplines to calculate the properties of energy, forces and motion, electrical and geometry in the development of products and projects.

 

2.2.2 Be able to apply the equations to calculate the properties of energy, forces and motion, electrical and geometry in the development of products and projects.

 

Students will complete their first attempt of the written examination for unit 1.

 

Half term 5

Unit 2 LO1 Produce hand drawn engineering drawings
 
Unit 2 LO2 Produce CAD engineering drawings

 

 

2.1.1 Be able to produce freehand sketches, including rendering, annotation and dimensions.

 

2.1.2 Be able to produce A3 hand drafted isometric drawing sheets.

 

2.1.3 Be able to produce A3 hand drafted orthographic third angle drawing sheets.

 

2.2.1 Be able to produce A3 CAD isometric drawing sheets.

 

2.2.2 Be able to produce A3 CAD orthographic third angle drawing sheets. 

 

Half term 6

Unit 2 LO4 Demonstrate processing skills and techniques applied to materials for a manufacturing task

 

4.1.1 Demonstrate a variety of processing skills and manufacturing techniques to prepare materials.

 

4.1.2 Demonstrate a variety of processing skills and manufacturing techniques to modify materials.

 

4.1.3 Demonstrate a variety of processing skills and manufacturing techniques to join materials.

 

4.1.4 Demonstrate a variety of processing skills and manufacturing techniques to finish materials.

 

4.2.1 Maintain safe and correct use of common tools, equipment and machines used in the engineering industry whilst undertaking manufacturing techniques.

In Year 11 students complete unit 2 and will complete a synoptic assessment which is worth 60% of the overall grade.

Academic Term

Learning outcome

Assessment criteria

 

Half term 1.

Unit 2 LO4 Demonstrate processing skills and techniques applied to materials for a manufacturing task

Unit 2 LO3 Demonstrate production planning techniques

4.1.1 Demonstrate a variety of processing skills and manufacturing techniques to prepare materials.

4.1.2 Demonstrate a variety of processing skills and manufacturing techniques to modify materials.

4.1.3 Demonstrate a variety of processing skills and manufacturing techniques to join materials. 

4.1.4 Demonstrate a variety of processing skills and manufacturing techniques to finish materials.

4.2.1 Maintain safe and correct use of common tools, equipment and machines used in the engineering industry whilst undertaking manufacturing techniques.

3.1.1 Be able to plan the manufacturing process of an engineered product, for a manufacturing task; create a risk assessment for health and safety.

3.1.2 Be able to plan the manufacturing process of an engineered product, for a manufacturing task; plan the individual stages of manufacture, including times and quality control.

 

Half term 2.

Prepare for synoptic assessment

Complete practice synoptic tasks in preparation for the 60% synoptic assessment.

 

Half term 3 and 4.

Complete synoptic assessment

AO1 Recall knowledge and show understanding

AO2 Apply knowledge and understanding

AO3 Analyse and evaluate knowledge and understanding

AO4 Demonstrate and apply technical skills and processes

AO5 Manage and evaluate the project

 

Half term 4 and 5.

Complete 2nd attempt of synoptic assessment (if needed)

AO1 Recall knowledge and show understanding

AO2 Apply knowledge and understanding

AO3 Analyse and evaluate knowledge and understanding

AO4 Demonstrate and apply technical skills and processes

AO5 Manage and evaluate the project


View Design and Technology / Engineering Sequencing

 

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